this day in crime history: september 16, 1920

On this date in 1920, an unidentified man stopped his horse-drawn cart in front of the J. P. Morgan building on Wall Street. He got down from the cart and disappeared into the noontime crowd. A short while later, a bomb consisting of dynamite and cast iron slugs detonated on the busy street. Thirty-eight people were killed and over four hundred were injured. Police conducted an exhaustive investigation that lasted over three years, but the case was never solved.

Further reading:

The Street.com: “Previous Terror on Wall Street — A Look at a 1920 Bombing”

FBI: Terror on Wall Street

Wikipedia: “Wall Street bombing”

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this day in crime history: september 4, 1977

SF Imperial Palace

On this date in 1977, a feud between two of San Francisco’s  Chinese street gangs led to a slaughter at the Golden Dragon restaurant. The Joe Boys were angry over the recent death of one of their members in a gunfight with the rival Wah Ching gang. Acting on a tip that a senior Wah Ching member would be at the Golden Dragon, a group of Joe Boys descended on the restaurant armed with shotguns and semi-automatic weapons. Upon entering the restaurant, they fired indiscriminately into the crowd. Five innocent bystanders were killed and eleven wounded. The target of the hit, Michael “Hot Dog” Louie, escaped unscathed.

Police rounded up five members of the Joe Boys. They were tried and convicted in connection with the murder. A  retaliation by the Wah Ching followed the massacre, which was then followed by the formation of the San Francisco Police Department’s  Asian Gang Task Force. The Golden Dragon went out of business in 2006. It’s location is now the home of the Imperial Palace restaurant.

Further reading:

Wikipedia – Golden Dragon massacre

Found SF – The Golden Dragon Restaurant Massacre

Mister SF – Golden Dragon Massacre

this day in crime history: august 20, 1986

USPSmemorial
Memorial to the incident in Edmond, OK

On this date in 1986, Postal Service employee Patrick Sherrill went on a shooting spree in a post office in Edmonds, OK. Twenty people were shot, leaving fourteen dead and six injured. At the conclusion of his rampage, Sherrill turned the gun on himself and committed suicide. It is believed that the shooting may have been motivated by a reprimand that Sherrill had received the day before. The incident is often credited with inspiring the phrase “going postal.”

Further reading:

Murderpedia – Patrick Henry Sherrill

Wikipedia – Patrick Sherrill

Time“Crazy Pat’s” Revenge

this day in crime history: august 15, 1914

JulianCarlton

On this date in 1914, Julian Carlton (pictured above) murdered seven people on the estate of architect Frank Lloyd Wright. Carlton, a native of Barbados, was employed as a servant at Taliesin, Wright’s estate near Spring Green, WI. Wright was out of town on the day of the murders. Carlton struck during lunch. Several estate employees were in the dining room, Wright’s mistress and two children on a nearby screened in porch. Carlton bolted all but one of the dining room doors shut. He poured gas under the doors and started a fire. After starting the fire, he ran to the screened-in porch and murdered Martha “Mamah” Borthwick and her two children with an ax. He then waited outside the dining room and attacked the employees as they tried to escape the fire. Three employees and the thirteen year old son of the estate’s head carpenter were killed. Only two of the dining room’s occupants survived.

After the fire was under control, Wright’s neighbors went looking for Carlton. They found him hiding in the basement furnace room. He had attempted unsuccessfully to commit suicide by drinking muriatic acid. Carlton was brought to the local jail, and later made several court appearances. He died of starvation before coming to trial. He never gave a reason for the attack. Calrton’s wife Gertrude, who worked at the estate as a cook, claimed she did not know why her husband committed the murders.

Further reading:

Provedentia – The Taliesin Murders

Wikipedia – Frank Lloyd Wright

this day in crime history: may 22, 1962

CA-Flt11

On this date in 1962, Continental Airlines Flight 11, enroute from Chicago to Kansas City, MO, crashed in Unionville, MO, killing all 45 of the Boeing 707’s occupants.

Several eyewitness accounts described an explosion at the rear of the plane while it was over Centerville, IA. Once it became apparent that an explosive device might be involved, the FBI was called in. They discovered that one of the passengers had purchased an inordinate amount of life insurance just prior to the flight. In addition to insurance, Thomas G. Doty also purchased six sticks of dynamite before his trip. The married father of a five year old daughter was facing prison time for an armed robbery.

Investigators believed that the bomb had been hidden in the rear lavatory on the starboard side of the plane. The explosion tore the tail section off the 707, which caused it to crash.

In July 2010, a memorial was erected in Unionville, MO.

Further reading:

Pitch News – Fifty years ago this week, Continental Flight 11 fell out of the sky over Unionville

Wikipedia – Continental Airlines Flight 11

Continental Airlines Flight 11 Facebook Page

Continental Airline Flight 11 Blog

this day in crime history: may 18, 1927


On this date in 1927, Bath, MI became the scene of the largest school mass-murder in U.S. history. The massacre began when school board member Andrew Kehoe became upset over an increase in the school tax that he blamed for his financial ruination.

Kehoe began by killing his wife and detonating fire bombs in his farm buildings. While firefighters worked to put out the fires on Kehoe’s property, Kehoe went to the Bath Consolidated School, where he detonated bombs he had previously planted in the school.

Kehoe left the scene after the explosion, but returned a short while later. He saw the school superintendent standing outside the school watching rescue and recovery efforts and called to him. As the superintendent approached the car, Kehoe detonated a bomb inside the car. The blast killed Kehoe, the superintendent, two local men, and an 8 year old boy who had managed to escape the school bombing.

The Bath School Disaster resulted in 45 dead and 58 injured. In 1975, a park dedicated to the victims was built on the former site of the school.

Further reading:

The Bath School Disaster

Wikipedia – Bath School Disaster 

this day in crime history: may 14, 1988

carrollton

On this day in 1988, an intoxicated driver named Larry Wayne Mahoney drove his pickup truck onto Interstate 71 in Kentucky. Mahoney was traveling north. In the southbound lane. Around 11:00 PM, he collided with a Church activity bus that was returning from a trip to the Kings Island amusement park. The crash caused a ruptured fuel tank, which resulted in the bus catching fire. Twenty-seven of the bus’s sixty-seven passengers were killed. Thirty-four more were injured. It was the deadliest drunk-driving accident in US history, and the second deadliest bus accident.

Mahoney was convicted of twenty-seven counts of manslaughter and sentenced to sixteen years in prison. He was released after serving just short of eleven years. A memorial next to Interstate 71 marks the site of the crash.

Further reading:

Wikipedia – Carrollton, Kentucky bus collision

The Cincinnati Enquirer – Drunken Driver Lives in Obscurity