pedal to the metal

Hellcat

Dodge recently announced the latest addition to its muscle car lineup: the 2015 Challenger SRT Hellcat. Its supercharged 6.2 liter Hemi V8 packs a 707 hp punch. Yes, you read that right, 707 horsepower. This baby is a rocket on wheels. No word yet on the price, but it’s safe to assume it’s probably more than I can afford right now. So is the gas, for that matter.

I don’t know about you, but when I hear the word “supercharged” combined with “Challenger”, the first thing that comes to mind is this little cinematic gem from 1971:

Advertisements

6 thoughts on “pedal to the metal

  1. I had a Buick Ultra, and it was beautiful right up to the day it caught fire on a highway and burned. The engine was fitted with a supercharger. I thought, as I was trained on aircraft years ago, that it would be similar to a P51 two phase/two stage supercharger, but it was only a single phase/single stage unit. Everything normal and no supercharger kicking in below 70 mph or flooring the accelerator pedal and a pronounced hesitation near stalling the engine. The units require extra maintenance by qualified persons, and that was the downfall of many Buick Ultra automobiles. Rode nice, loved that car.
    For the Mopar to push 707h.p., and I loved Mopars, the entire mill would have to be reworked as a mid-to-high rpm performance engine detune enough for the streets to meet emissions standards. Flip side of the coin is, the street mill had the EPA plumbing removed and thus was able to reach its potential. Consider that a standard C-15 Caterpillar engine of 475h.p., if worked, can reach 729h.p., and the A-Cert version, believe it or not, by Caterpillars charts, could potentially hit 830 h.p., by removal of all EPA plumbing.
    The 707h.p. Challenger, would only be good if, the balance of the suspension and chasis were beefed up and, the person operating the vehicle was skilled plus, having the correct setting to bring out the performance without endangering life or property. Remember, if anyone gets into a chase situation with police, if apprehended, they are also charged with endangering the life of whatever number of cops are chasing them. Felony class.

    On a personal note: Two of my brothers had a lead foot. One gave lip service to a NYS Trooper for doing an excess of 120 mph on radar. He told the Trooper, “My brother’s a cop” nonsense, and to the credit of the Trooper, arrested my brother. My other brother was stopped by NYC Highway Patrol. Yes, he showed the family relative stuff of photo and mini-shield. The highway cop told my brother to exit and step to the back of the car. “Your brother is Sergeant X?” My brother said, ‘yes’. The Highway cop smacked him hard in the face. “Your brother is a friend and my former sergeant. He would have done the same thing to you. Now call him and tell him what happened.” I got the full story from the cop as my brother gave a slightly “modified” version. That brother, since that happening, never sped heavily again. He still recalls it every now and then. (“Cop was 7-feet tall with a flat-top crew cut. Looked like an oak tree. Long leather coat with the belt and gold buttons. Big boots…”)

    Like

    • That whole, “I know Officer So-and-so” routine can really backfire. The cop who pulled you over may actually know Officer So-and-so, but that’s no guarantee you’ll skate. There’s always a chance that you were pulled over by a cop who hates Officer So-and-so. I mean, even cops don’t necessarily like all their co-workers. 😉

      Like

  2. John D.:
    THAT new Challenger might just re-establish MOPAR back the stables…(even if the company is owned by FIAT).
    That some SERIOUS BHP..and to add a SUPERCHARGE…well, that’s too frigging awesome.
    Like to see the Brits test drive it on TOP GEAR.
    (sure to pass everything BUT a gas station…JUST like the old 440 hemis…LOL)

    And Vanishing Point (the 1971 version only) was a VERY good flick, even f it was a bit ambiguous.

    Stay safe (and keep the shiny side UP) out there.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s